Monday, January 3, 2011

Anniv Trip Pics Pt 1: Silverton Murals

We went to the Oregon Garden Resort in Silverton to celebrate our 10th anniversary.

Silverton has murals. Lots of murals.

Also, they have a nifty map to the murals.

Also, they have nice pictures of all the murals online.

We drove around and took our own pictures of all the murals.

Look.

Oh, wait. First we took a picture of this super gorgeous church.



Okay, now murals.



Explanation about the Four Freedoms from Roosevelt's 1941 State of the Union address.



Freedom from Fear



Freedom from Want



Freedom of Speech



Freedom of Worship ~ You can see how all four paintings look next to each other here.



This is Homer Davenport. I don't really know who he is.



But it appears he may have had an Arabian Quest of some kind. In 1906.



Ah, good. Here is some information about him. And here.



Covered bridge. I think Silverton has a thing for covered bridges. Over half of the wall art in our hotel was photographs of old covered bridges. Wonder if there's an engagement ring in that picnic basket.



This is an astronaut. Don Pettit. He was born in Silverton.



"Paws for Love therapy dogs, and their human companions, are trained and certified to help enrich and provide emotional support for people by visiting hospitals, nursing homes, and schools. Children learn by reading to these wonderful dogs at the Silver Falls Library." Jeff's mom does this (or did this?) with one (or more?) of her dogs. Pretty cool.



This is a teency part of the whole mural, which is, like, half a block long or something. I chose this view onaccounta the shrubbery.



I like this one. My grandpa was a logger.



Here is a very big painting of a very big camera. World's biggest camera, apparently. A Mammoth! (Ha ha.)



"Silverton, the town that still believes."

Tim Allen, the actor whose Santa likeness is still painted on the sides of buildings.



Gosh, Silverton. You've got Norman Rockwell, Homer Davenport, Don Pettit, pet-shaped shrubbery, the biggest camera in the world, and Santa Claus. Now a world-chamption cowboy? Sheesh. Is there anything you don't have?



This is the middle of a three-frame mural chronicling the 20th century. I chose to favor the soldier who chose to favor my freedom.



A baseball team? Silverton! Come on! You even had a baseball team?



I was nursing my five-week-old firstborn son when Jeff called from his commute and told me to turn on the TV. After I watched it three days non-stop, he finally had to tell me to turn it back off again. Where were you?



This dog, Bobbie, got separated from his family while they vacationed in Indiana in 1923. Six months later, he showed up back at home in Oregon. He had walked all the way.



Pioneers. (Also, I bet that dog walked farther than Bobbie. Just sayin'.)



My second most favoritest mural. Two reasons. You get one guess.



The explanation mural of my most favoritest mural. My favoritest line from this plaque is, "To me, the old oak always stands, and under it the men play marbles." ~Homer Davenport



Ta-da! Here it is. Very beautiful. Romantic. Idyllic. Love it, love it.  Here is the whole thing.



Not a mural. But guess what these are. I guessed bulls. Wrong.



Also not a mural. A house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. It is meant to epitomize living in harmony with the Oregon countryside, and it is the only FLW structure in the Pacific Northwest open to public viewing. For $10. We peeked in the windows to see if it was worth the money, frowned, cocked our heads to the side, and blithely committed ignorant architectural heresy by wondering why in the world anyone would ever want to live there.



And finally, this is not actually an official mural, but it is a big painting on the side of a building, so there you go. It's actually a straight building; we're just lazy photographers. You can see that it's straight here. It is also original advertising from 1891, which is why I like it. Also, don't forget to use Germea for breakfast.

Stay tuned for part two. Pictures from the Oregon Garden. Mostly.